Convergence Online Exhibition

The inspiration for Convergence comes from an article posted on the MAHB:

Dear MAHB Community,
[…] These stressors have now converged and the result is peaceful protests disrupted by opportunists, agitators, and failed leadership; the trigger for the convergence was the murder of a black citizen by the very people we pay to protect us and the failure of law-enforcement to respond quickly to those responsible. That was the trigger but not the cause. Just as all of the stressors have links to overpopulation and overconsumption by the wealthy, all of the stressors have links to systemic racism, sexism and oppression This is a MAHB moment—the stressors are interacting and manifesting their power in violence. It is time to come together and strengthen pro-social civil society’s influence—violence is not the enemy; violence is the symptom. […]

Featured Artists

Steven Dewitt, Cynthia Fusillo, Michele Guieu, Pascal Ken, Eric Meyer, Alise Sheehan, Ivan Sigg, Marcela Villaseñor.

Exhibition

Retrouver des couleurs, tisser les lignes
Find colors, weave the lines

2020
  • Eric Meyer

Listen

Paper, coffee on paper, magnolia leaf, collage
65cm x 65cm

“Nobody’s free until everybody’s free”
~ Fannie Lou Hammer
2020
  • Cynthia Fusillo

Untitled

Digital photograph

I photographed this rock at the southern tip of Shikoku (Japan). The ocean created these tender cells and then filled them with different quartz. There is not a bigger artist than nature! As the Taoist monk, Shitao said in the 17th century “The painter’s activity is not to imitate the various facts of Creation, but to reproduce the very act by which nature creates”. To meditate in this human confused period.
2020
  • Ivan Sigg

Discarded Glove

Digital photograph

One of the 200+ photographs I’ve created of discarded gloves in East Harlem during the pandemic.
2020
  • Steven Dewitt

A sign of the times

Digital photograph

This sign is near a road cut off by a flooding creek. It seemed so fitting for our times. Here are some of the questions flooding my mind. Why does our world seem so cut off from sanity, and civility? Why is hatred such an easy bandwagon to jump on? Why do people stop thinking about what might be hurting others just to avoid having anything change?
2020
  • Alise Sheehan

Untitled

Photograph

I shared the MAHB concerns about the human predicament: “the multiple cracks in our ecosystems, our fragile fantasy-based economic systems, our unjust agricultural and food systems, neglected public health systems, education systems too often consciously designed to reinforce ignorance, inequity, and greed—to name a few of the stressors.”

All these stressors are interacting. At the same time. Each stressor can worsen at any time and start an unpredictable chain reaction.

I realized the scope of our predicament two years ago and it definitely started a journey for me. Not an easy one: talking about the human predicament is complicated. People are either informed or not. If they are, and if they went over the grieving period, they are ready for action. If they are not, they usually do not wish to listen.

As an artist, I am looking for ways to address the complexity of the situation. How can I address this problem systemically, transversally, and not “in silo”? How might I make people understand that it is not “just” about biodiversity loss, or resource depletion, or water scarcity, or possible wars?

It is our relationship with the living world that needs to be changed. The relationship between humans, the relationship with other species, the relationship with the land, the water, and the air.

We are not at the center.

Are we going to watch the convergence of all the stressors? Or can we, humans, envision a convergence, move and work together towards “reducing the threat of a shattering collapse of civilization”?
2020
  • Michele Guieu

Where are we going now?

Digital photograph (Morocco 2005, Japan 2009, Brittany France 2015)
15x15cm

Responsible citizens have knowledge about their role in their communities, their country, and their world.
Responsible citizens participate in activities that make their world a better place. Responsible citizens are change agents that act out against social, economic, and environmental injustices
2020
  • Pascal Ken
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